It occurs to me that, yes, we eat a lot of cabbage. At least once a week. And this week, 3, oh wait, 4 times.


First and Second Offense:

The pre-chopped power slaw spoke to me at the whole foods store… and I just had to buy it. I added chopped apples and green onions, and whisked together 1/2 cup of vegan mayo with 1/2 teaspoon of pepper and 2 Tablespoons of lemon juice. Tossed it all together, and my youngest took some to lunch the next day. (Sorry no pics…) The rest we used as 2 dinner side dishes. One was with a tuna casserole dish I will post about next time I make it. The other was shepherd’s pie that is in the queue to be posted next Sunday.


Third Offense:

I like sautéed cabbage. So I bought a head of organic green cabbage – hey, it looked awesome shining there in the glow of the not-tungsten lighting that the whole foods store is wise to install in the produce section.

There’s this great recipe I have in my very elaborately named The Vegetarian Cookbook. (See my Reading List page for the picture.)

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I cook some Soba Noodles and add them last with the soy sauce. Yum.

Apologies that there isn’t a final picture. (We were hungry. lol)

Of important note though is that the elaborately named book calls for ‘shallots’ and ‘root ginger’, but is kind enough to let you know that the greens are interchangeable.

  • Shallots are a type of onion. Somewhere between an onion and garlic. Virtually any onion will replace shallots in a recipe as long as it isn’t strong flavored. And even then, if you only have yellow, burn-your-eyes onion? Just half the amount. This recipe calls for 6 shallots. Which, if chopped would be, eh, about 3/4 cups. So, I was able to use 4 somewhat large green onions.
  • Root Ginger is a recipe ingredient I have braved once or twice. But, it was difficult to keep from ruining in the pure form. Two possibilities: I haven’t learned how to store it properly OR I don’t use enough to keep the whole root around. So, for recipes, I now use ground ginger from the herb and spice section. 1 teaspoon per 2 ‘slices’ seems to work.
  • The Greens alternatives are a great thing to remember. ANY recipe that calls for greens of some sort will work with another sort. So, if it says ‘chard’ and you’re like, what the heck is chard? Fear not. That spinach or green leaf you have in the crisper will work… Yes, even salad lettuce like green leaf and arugula are interchangeable, with some changes. Of note, some greens take longer to cook (like any Kale), and others release more water (like spinach and green leaf – reduce any broth or water additions by about 1/4 the required amount). Water-releasing greens like spinach and lettuce need only be ‘wilted’ into the recipe at the very end.

Fourth Offense in the Queue:

Yes, I still have one-half of a head of cabbage to use before it goes bad. I bought some Q’ourn sausage and am doing a stir fry with some onions and kale for dinner tonight. (Can’t wait!)


As always, I hope this will help you be brave in the kitchen and try some fruit or vegetable you have never tried before. And remember when a recipe calls for a specific item, no worries… just look for another item in the same food classification.

*Of note: all the recipes minus the last one are completely vegan. Tonight’s dish is vegetarian.